Lately – February 2017

Lately:

Things I’ve been reading:

  • The Bone People. About three people – a man, a woman, and a child – all damaged. Set in New Zealand. Really beautiful, really hard to read at points, and really wonderful.
  • Big Little Lies. I read this on a short vacation in Park City last weekend. I was in the middle of reading Underground Railroad, but switched to this so that I could start watching the HBO series. I thought I had read it already, but I hadn’t. (Instead, I’d read The Husband’s Secret by the same author.) Anyway, a quick, fun, suspenseful read!
  • The Underground Railroad. Currently reading. Isn’t everyone? I’m going to a book club for this book on Wednesday (in three days!) and I’m only 30% into it. I should not have deviated last weekend to read Big Little Lies. Sigh. Anyway, I’m into it, it’s not that I’m not into it. I was just feeling a little beaten up after The Sympathizer and The Bone People and not wanting to read something with torture and abuse. Hence the deviation. But I’m back at it, and maybe I’ll be able to read enough by  Wednesday.

Things I’ve been watching:

  • Big Little Lies. I’ve watched the first two episodes. I think it’s good. It’s so hard to watch things based on books I’ve read. So far, it has only minor deviations from the book. I think it’s good. Certainly good enough to have on while I’m cooking dinner!
  • The Putin segment of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. I don’t actually usually watch these types of shows (I group this with The Daily Show, SNL, Colbert, etc.). But I always wish I watched them more, and on the particular evening I watched this, I really wanted some perspective and comic relief on the media.

Things I’ve been eating:

  • Many of the recipes from Cassy Joy Garcia’s Fed & Fit book, including:
    • Cold Cut Roll-ups
    • Basic Pork Tenderloin and Easy Parsnip Mash
    • Roasted Fruit Pops
    • Anti-inflammatory Smoothie (I added spinach.)fullsizeoutput_aa9a
    • Buffalo Ranch Bison Burgers and Braised Greens (Really enjoyed these, and have been eating the leftovers in a salad with roasted sweet potato chunks and leftover homemade paleo ranch dressing, also from the book.)fullsizeoutput_aa99
    • Plantain Protein Pancakes with Salted Raspberry Jam (Yum.)
    • Sausage & Cranberry Stuffed Acorn Squash with Rosemary Orange Cream Sauce (thought I would love this, but I think I could have cooked my acorn longer, and citrus-y anything is really hit or miss for me. The orange cream sauce was a bit of a miss.) (Photo is from before I cooked it. You couldn’t see any red after I cooked it.)fullsizeoutput_aa98
    • Lemony Kale & Sausage Soup (wasn’t sure I would like this because, again, citrus. But turns out it was delicious and the lemon wasn’t lemon-y tasting, just bright.)
    • Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash Casserole (quite a lot of prep but pretty good).a2e19108-4b8a-401e-ba8e-3a1021aea263
    • Buffalo Chicken Casserole (made for the Super Bowl, and made with spaghetti squash instead of potatoes, which I didn’t have. Very good.)

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  • And… HelloFresh! Dan and I tried it out for two weeks. We meant to only do one week (we had an introductory offer), but I forgot to cancel it in time. I have to say, all the meals were really, really, really good. Easy to prepare, not too time consuming. I’ve always sort of pooh poohed these home delivery dinner things, since I have no trouble prioritizing grocery shopping and making dinner. But. It was convenient and delicious. And I was able to make them all paleo/Fed&Fit compliant. We’re trying Blue Apron with an introductory offer next week 🙂 (but those will be more difficult to make paleo/compliant). Some photos:

Races I’ve registered for:

Fitness I’ve been doing:

  • Still CrossFitting at CrossFit Federal Hill. 3x week, except the past two weeks. I developed some fairly intense low back pain throughout January, and it got so bad a few weeks ago that I totally put the halt on everything. Then I saw a PT and met with the gym owner and gained back some confidence to keep moving but taking it easy. So now I’m back at it, with lower weights.
  • Still running 2x week. Yesterday, I did a 6-mile trail run in Patapsco State Park. I combined the Soapstone Trail with the Grist Mill Trail and road, then the River Trail, and returned on the Grist Mill Trail from the swinging bridge. Clio had a blast (so did I). It was near 70 degrees! I’ll be doing more trail runs to get ready for the half marathon. Fun!
  • Easy C1 yoga at CorePowerYoga in Fed Hill and Canton. This has been amazing for my back. I hadn’t been in a while, but have been 3-4 times over the past two weeks.
  • Skiing at Snowbird and Deer Valley in Utah last weekend.

So that’s that! I’m going to do a cooking class tonight with Baltimore Delta Gamma alumnae at Pier Point Restaurant. Looking forward to it!

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Eating and Skiing in Park City

Dan and I had a romantical weekend in Park City, UT last weekend. Here’s what we ate:

  • Handle. We ate here our first night. We shared four starters (beet salad, mushrooms, smoked trout, and buffalo cauliflower) and one entree (venison). They’re famous for their buffalo cauliflower, apparently, and it was good… but I could have taken or left it. It was probably good to have because Dan was hungry. But the beet salad (with a duck egg), mushrooms (with crusty bread slathered in some kind of fat), and smoked trout (with pepper jelly and ricotta cream) were really great. The venison was simplegreat but not the star. The service was pretty good (definitely acceptable but not impeccable), and the atmosphere was nice.
  • Firewood. We ate here our second night in Park City. This restaurant has only been open for about 8 weeks, I believe, and you could tell. As I mentioned in my Charlottesville post, the entry process at restaurants can make or break the experience for me. When we arrived, there were several other groups in the entryway of this restaurant. It was unclear what they were all doing, but it seemed that one was waiting for a table, one was getting their coats hung up (nice touch – something I looked for and was missing at Handle). But the walkway to the host podium was clear, so I walked up to it, where the hostess was looking down at her iPad. And continued to look down, doing stuff. And continued. After a minute or so, she finally looked up and greeted me. Not. Cool. Then we had to ask to get our coats hung (the coat hang lady didn’t realize we were not part of another group or waiting for that, but that’s forgivable). Finally, we were seated. When our server walked up, he had a card in his hands, and he too, was looking down at it (I think reading from it, actually), as he approached our table, and he did not make eye contact for the first several seconds. He ended up being a fine server, though a little awkward. The food was really good, though. We split two starters (oak wood roasted acorn squash with baby greens, goat cheese and cardamom spiced pumpkin seeds – YUM!; and the applewood smoked burrata with beets and tarragon pesto) and each had a main (Dan had the rack of lamb with lentil ragout, and I had the berbere spiced duck). All very, very good. Especially that roasted acorn squash. God.
  • Wasatch Brew Pub. Nothing special, just burgers and beer (my burger was pretty salty, actually). But the service was notable. Again, nothing special, very casual… but very well-timed, no awkwardness. It was in stark contrast to the evening before at Firewood. (We overheard that our server was also a server at a fancy restaurant, I believe at Deer Valley, so that might explain it.

We skied at Snowbird and Deer Valley. Snowbird was white out conditions – not my fave. Deer Valley started out with some windy, white out conditions, but the weather improved, and I had a really, really enjoyable day. I didn’t want it to be over! (Usually by 3 I’m ready to cuddle up with my book and a drink in the lodge, but not this day.)

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Revelstoke

Six or so years ago, my husband and his best friend spent a day skiing with a classmate of my husband’s and her father. They raved about the skiing in this place called Revelstoke in British Columbia, Canada. I think it was a new resort at the time. (Wikipedia just told me it opened in December 2007.) My husband and his best friend have fantasized about skiing there ever since.

The two of them have been skiing together out west at least once a year (and usually more) for the past ten years. For the first six of those years, it was just the two of them and occasionally me and/or someone else who was available for a somewhat random ski hill meetup, like with Dan’s classmate. But for the past four years, it has been a bigger group/reunion, with a core group of six of us that all went to the same college, plus a few other friends or significant others each year. Four years ago, we rented a house outside Park City. I believe there were 7 of us that  year. The next year, we got a house (the best house ever) in Big Sky, Montana. We were… 12? that year. Again, friends from college, Atlanta, a friend of mine from Madison, and friends of friends. Last year was thrown together a little late – we were 8 staying in a not-as-great house in Salt Lake City and driving to ski resorts, but I had one of my favorite days skiing ever at Powder Mountain. And this year, finally, we made the trek to Revelstoke, Canada. This year there were 8 of us total.

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It took 17 hours of traveling to get there, and 17 hours to get home yesterday. Both travel days, we had to wake up at 3 am local time. But it was worth it.

We got to see friends:

 

There were some amazing views of Revelstoke and the Columbia River:

 

And Lake Louise in Banff:

 

Plus I got to go for a short 3-mile hike, all by myself, fresh tracks, in Mount Revelstoke National Park (with snow up to my waist when I accidentally stepped off the path – the pictures don’t quite capture it):

 

And see wildlife. In the middle of the Trans-Canada Highway:

 

And eat good food. Some of which was only good-tasting if not good for me:

As far as eating goes, our MO has become a huge Costco shopping trip as soon as we arrive to purchase food for the week. Each person/couple takes a night to cook and populates a shared grocery shopping list in advance. We spend the last night (or in this case, two) eating leftovers. One or two people also take on sandwich-making duties each morning for everyone for on-mountain lunches. It works out great. Our Costco trip for 8 people this time for the week was under $500. That’s about $60/person for food for the week. Not bad. And everyone makes really good food. In the picture above, Dan is eating a taco filled with mole chicken we made together. For dinners, we ate:

  • Saturday (arrival day): burgers and sausages, salad, and sweet potato fries
  • Sunday: meatballs and pasta (atop kale for me)
  • Monday: homemade pizza
  • Tuesday: chicken in mole sauce, plus taco fixings
  • Wednesday: tofu stir fry
  • Thursday and Friday: leftovers

We did pretty well this time not wasting any food. In past years, we’ve eaten at least one dinner out. This time, we didn’t do any (though I did fill up on that poutine in the picture above on the last day at the Lake Louise ski resort), but we probably should have eaten out the last night. We were really scrounging. But we got back from Lake Louise late after a harrowing 3.5 hour drive through fog and snowy roads along the Trans-Canada Highway and then had to get up at 3 am the next morning to drive 2.5 hours more, so eating out wasn’t really in the cards.

I skied 4 days – 3 at Revelstoke and 1 at Lake Louise. Two friends and I (we are known as the ‘Blue Crew,’ but have sort of graduated to the ‘Blue-Black Crew’) took a private lesson on the second afternoon that was a lot of fun. I like doing stuff that challenges me (i.e., not just the blue groomers), but I like having my hand held when I do it.

Revelstoke was amazing. It has the longest vertical in North America (5,620 feet). The longest run (the green run that goes from the top all the way down) is 9.5 miles long. It was exhausting. We got a fair amount of snow mid-week and had a lot of powder on Wednesday, which was incredible. So fun. Longer lift lines, unfortunately, but worth it.

Lake Louise was okay. It was kind of icy in parts and had less varied/interesting terrain. The view across the valley of Lake Louise was incredible, though. Pictures don’t do any of this justice. And I was sort of cold that day and pretty tired from the week. I only skied about 3.5 hours. Then I went to the pub and drank a hot toddy and ate poutine.

I always try to hike at least one day while on these ski trips. I love hiking in the snow. I’ve been fortunate to find  hikes that are manageable without snow shoes. (Except for that time two years ago in Big Sky when Dan and another friend and I hiked six miles into a canyon and definitely should have had snow shoes.) This hike was easily accessible from town, didn’t feel too remote to make me feel nervous, and elevated my heart rate at times but didn’t leave me exhausted. It was a rest day, after all.

All in all, a very good trip. I’m very glad to be home, though, and back to my routine. Like  most Sundays, yesterday I grocery shopped and made lunch for the week. And I was back at CrossFit this morning at 5:30 am…

Tri Tri a Duathlon

Exactly a year ago, I saw my new neighbor, hot and sweaty, carrying her bike into her house. She had just finished the Iron Girl triathlon in Columbia, MD. I’ve always been interested in doing a triathlon, and she was very supportive (in a motherly I’ll-take-care-of-you-and-make-it-not-scary sort of way), so I pretty much decided on the spot to do it with her the following year. She stayed on me throughout the fall to make sure I signed up. It’s 1,000 m swim, 16 mile bike, and 5 k run.

The event was today. I joined a gym from mid-June through July and have been swimming there at least once a week for the past six or so weeks. Dan’s been able to go with me. I started doing ‘brick’ (new term for me) workouts on the weekends maybe five weeks ago, mostly with my supportive neighbor and/or my husband. For the past three,  I’ve done almost the whole distance, swimming 1,000 m at Hammerman Beach, biking 12 miles, and then running 3 miles around the park. For the first several weeks, I kept up my regular schedule of running 3 miles every Tuesday and Thursday morning, but toward the end that fell off a bit. I kept it pretty light this past week. I started CrossFit Foundations classes on Monday, did that again on Tuesday, and ran 3 miles Thursday morning. I felt really good going into the weekend and really excited to complete my first triathlon.

And then we all found out Friday morning that the swim was cancelled!! For good reasons. We had a pretty bad storm last weekend (which caused major flooding and damage in nearby historic Ellicott City), and the lake water is still too toxic for swimming. So, you know, I’m glad they cancelled it. BUT I WAS REALLY DISAPPOINTED! Part of this whole thing for me was just trying to figure it all out. The things that have kept me from signing up for a triathlon ever before, honestly, were: 1) I don’t understand what you wear (even after I figured out that things like tri suits existed, I was still unclear about what to do about a sports bra for extra support) and 2) Transitions?! What? And like… swimming without lanes? So, I just wanted to figure all that out. But alas – no swim, so this morning, I completed my first duathlon! Run 0.25 miles, bike 16 miles, run 3.1 miles (but guys… that last ‘0.1’ mile was way longer than that).

Anyway, it was a lot of fun! And I still feel pretty prepared for whatever future triathlon I do.

Transition area yesterday and this morning pre-race:

Post-race!

For breakfast, right before I left home at 5am, I drank a smoothie I’d made a couple days ago with almond milk, almond butter, a banana, and spinach. At about 6:30 (an hour before the race), I ate another banana. Post-race, before the hunger set in, I had another banana! It was the only post-race food that was #Whole30-compliant! They also had chicken salad (weird, right), maple water (? never knew that existed), and bagels. Oh, and snow cones.

And then we sat around for an hour to wait for the awards ceremony because my supportive neighbor and another neighbor both placed in their respective Athena categories (!!!). And that’s when hunger started to set in. So I had… another banana. Four bananas before 11 am! Eeek. All day sugar high. We finally went back to the transition area around 11:30 where I had some nuts, and I shoved those in my face.

At home, after putting everything away and showering, I finally got to really eat. I heated up leftover roasted vegetables from last night’s dinner and a half of a leftover chicken breast from a couple days ago and then added two eggs and some chopped green onion. Since it was mostly from leftovers, it was super quick and easy (thank god!). Plus more coffee. (I’ve been trying to limit my coffee consumption to 1-2 cups per day this month, and so far have been successful. But… treating myself today. Sugar-and-caffeine-high-all-day-all-day!)

Overall, pretty good experience. I think I’ll do it again.

She Eats (and Hikes) in Charlottesville

I spent the weekend in Charlottesville with a good friend who lives in DC but is doing a law internship in Charlottesville for the summer. I had never spent time in Charlottesville before, though I’ve driven through/near/around several times, and was glad for the opportunity.

I drove down Friday after being let out of work early for the 4th of July holiday weekend. I’d driven to the DC Metro red line in the morning instead of taking the MARC train as I usually do, so was able to start driving from north of DC around 3:30. With DC traffic on a Friday afternoon before a long weekend and several thunderstorms, I didn’t arrive in Charlottesville until 7pm. I had NPR, the Minimalists (Episode 28), Liz Wolfe and Cassy Joy Garcia (Balanced Bites Episode 250), and then some poppy music to keep me company along the way.

Soon after I arrived, we went to Monsoon Siam for dinner and sat on the porch. Our meals were delicious (and actually spicy) – my friend had Kapow Jae to maximize the vegetables, and I had the pik pow with added broccoli – but the entry process was annoying. It wasn’t clear where to enter or who to talk to about putting our name in for a table (or even if that was necessary). Things like that drive me crazy. Then, once we got seated, a server didn’t come for probably at least 20 minutes. My friend ended up going to the bar for waters, and then ultimately went back to the bar for beers before we ever had a server come. To be fair, they seemed understaffed and overbusy. I probably would have been more forgiving if not for the initial entry process confusion. Anyway.

After dinner, we walked along the pedestrian mall and went to The Southern to see some music (Rob Cheathem & Co.).

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On Saturday, I woke up at 5:30 like usual (annoying) and was out for my triathlon training workout by 6:15. I didn’t bring my bike, so I borrowed my friend’s hybrid. And Charlottesville is hilly. I biked west of town and back in a big loop, and then I ran 3 miles down through the UVA campus and back to her house. I was pooped. Did I mention it was hilly? While running, I snapped a photo of this church. Yay, equality.

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To get the day started, we went to the Charlottesville farmers market downtown and then to Bluegrass Grill for brunch. At the farmer’s market, my friend bought tomatoes, and we both bought a bucket of peaches. It seems early for peach season, but man, they’re delicious. For brunch, I had a potato scramble with (some sort of weird, fake, but still meat) chorizo, egg, peppers, onions, and tomatoes.

After an unfortunate locking-of-keys-in-trunk incident, we spent the afternoon being lazy on her lawn, snacking on nuts and fruit.

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We went to a barbecue at one of her friends’ houses that evening, where we ate some delicious salads, steak, and sausage.

On Sunday, we ate breakfast at home (Greek TJ’s yogurt, nuts, and banana for me) before setting out for a hike. Shenandoah and other mountainous areas were a further drive than we wanted, so we went to the Fortune’s Cove Nature Conservancy about 35 minutes from Charlottesville outside Lovingston, VA. The hike was five miles-ish and relatively steep both up and down. The day was overcast and foggy so the views weren’t great, but it was still pretty. Parts of the trail had a lot of growth; the trail to the top of High Top mountain, a slight detour off the trail, was particularly overgrown. And not worth it at all, due to the lack of views and the creepy I-feel-like-I’m-in-an-episode-of-Lost gated building. But overall I’d recommend the hike. It was very well marked, a great workout, and pretty.

We didn’t see a ton of wildlife, but what we did see was super unexpected. First, we ran into a turtle. Next, near the top, were a TON of these three-dimensional spiderwebs. And finally, where the trail crossed a fire road on the way down, we saw some large animal that we’re still debating: was it a dog? A coyote? Or, where I think we’ve settled, a fisher weasel? It looked kind of like a raccoon, except four times as big. And kind of like a dog, except it… ambled more… like a bear. Who knows. We saw it from behind, and its most defining characteristic was its very bushy tail. I wish we’d taken a picture.

The nature preserve was just across the road from Mountain Cove Winery, so we stopped for a tasting before heading home. It’s apparently the oldest winery in Virginia!

We were starving (it was late afternoon), so we stopped at Al Carbon for rotisserie chicken that totally hit the spot. It was delicious. So were the roasted vegetables and sweet potato sides that I got. My friend liked her chicken, but thought some of the sides were too rich and creamy.

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Due to the late lunch, we didn’t need a proper dinner, so snacked on more nuts and fruit (and TJ turkey sausage) for a late evening snack.

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For my last meal in Charlottesville, we went this morning to the Oakhurst Inn Cafe and Espresso Bar for breakfast. It was so charming – in a house, with pretty wood tables and enormous cups of coffee. I would love to stay at the Inn. My friend and I both got the baked farm eggs, and I got a side avocado salad that I’m pretty sure had an entire avocado in it. The baked eggs were delicious (and a little spicy), but the dressing on the avocado salad was my favorite part of the meal.

And finally, after returning home early this afternoon, I made myself a salad with the last of the Trader Joe’s turkey salami, a tomato from our farm box, part of an avocado, and a peach from the Charlottesville farmers market. Yum.

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Humpback Rock

On a ridiculously foggy weekend in May, Dan and I drove to Virginia for a wedding near Charlottesville. On the way there, we stopped for a hike at Humpback Rock. My colleague, who’d been to both Veritas Vineyards, the wedding venue, and Wintergreen Resort, where all the wedding guests were staying, recommended it as a good workout with nice views.

I’m sure the views were very nice. We could only see about five feet in front of us. But it was still a lovely hike. We saw only a few other people on the trail, and it was a good uphill bit (maybe one mile) that got the heart rate up, followed by a leisurely, lower-grade three miles downhill. Another friend did the same hike the following (sunny!) weekend (after attending a different wedding at the same venue!) and posted pictures that looked great! Maybe someday we’ll go back.

And the wedding we went to was fun too!

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Michaux State Forest, PA

Two weekends ago, we went hiking in Michaux State Forest, which is a long and narrow state park in Pennsylvania, just over the state border from Maryland. The Appalachian Trail runs through it’s entire north-south length, 37 miles. It’s great because you can backcountry camp anywhere in the state forest, and dogs are allowed. Also, there is a campground roughly in the middle. For our twice-yearly weekend backpacking trips, we like to camp at a campground on Friday night after we all drive up after work and then hike and do an overnight Saturday to Sunday. This destination also nice because it’s two hours or under from both DC and Baltimore, where most folks were coming from, and provides a lot of flexibility in terms of the amount of hiking people want to do, which we fully took advantage of on this trip.

Dan and I did a similar trip two summers ago. It was the only camping trip we’ve ever done just the two of us. That trip was more about getting out of the city, getting into nature, and relaxing than it was about hiking a lot. We actually drove up Saturday morning and didn’t start hiking until about noon or one. I think we hiked a max of four miles (maybe two hours?) before setting up camp and just hanging out for the remainder of the afternoon. We then hiked four more miles Sunday morning to finish the 8-mile loop, and were finished in time to have lunch in Gettysburg (~20 minutes outside the state park, on the way back to Baltimore) and walk around there a bit.

This time, we arrived in Caledonia State Park late on Friday night. I drove with a friend from DC, Dan drove with our dog and another dog we were dog-sitting at the time from Baltimore, two other friends also drove from DC, and another person drove (all the way!) from Rochester, NY. We all arrived between 9 and 10 pm. It was raining, unfortunately, but we still hung out around a campfire. The next morning was still wet, but it had stopped raining. The rest of the weekend was beautiful weather – which turned out to be the last nice weather we saw in the DC/Baltimore region until now!

Three other friends, including Dan’s sister, met us at the campsite Saturday morning from DC and Silver Spring for some day hiking. So, six people (and two dogs!) camped Friday night, and nine of us set off hiking on Saturday. We started on the AT in the campground (lower left hand part of the map below, the blue line) and all hiked together into the afternoon, stopping for lunch at the Quarry Gap AT shelter.

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When we arrived at the intersection with Stillhouse Hollow Road, we all split off. The three that had arrived that morning did, I would guess, a full 10-mile loop by continuing on Stillhouse Hollow Road and looping back ultimately on Greenwood Road (an old fire road that’s more of a trail) back to the AT (hopefully getting to see Long Pine Run Reservoir!) and then drove back to DC that evening; a couple turned around and went back on the AT (for maybe a full 8-mile hike) and stayed another night at the campground; and four of us continued on for what was about 10 full miles on Saturday before finding a lovely camping spot a short ways after splitting off from the AT onto the Rocky Knob Trail (orange line below) and beginning the return loop.

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After splitting off, the four of us that were backpacking stopped for a leisurely mid-afternoon coffee break in the middle of the trail.

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While we were chilling, a group of about 15 boy scouts caught up to us, and we started to fear that they’d beat us to whatever perfect campsite lay ahead of us. So we packed up and continued on our way. It turns out that I think the boy scouts continued on the AT past the turnoff to Rocky Knob to get to the next AT shelter. However, in our haste to stay ahead of them, we passed quickly by the only water source that we’d seen all day. After setting up camp, Dan and I went in search of some more water, but to no avail. We were fine (and ultimately weren’t THAT far from the water source we’d seen had we been really concerned), but definitely had to ration our water between the four of us and the dogs.

The campsite we found was lovely and allowed for plenty of hammock, campfire, and dog play time.

On Sunday, we continued down the Rocky Knob to the Beaver Trail, Greenwood Road, and back to the AT, for roughly 8 miles – a total of 18 between the two days. Along the way, we found and filled up on water (and promptly stopped and had late morning hot chocolate and coffee). We walked along the edge of the lovely Long Pine Run Reservoir. And we stopped again for early afternoon coffee and snacks. When we were finished, the dogs were hot and beat.

We finished around 1 or 2pm. Our friend from Rochester drove home, and the remaining three of us had burgers and beers at The Pub & Restaurant in Gettysburg before going our separate ways to DC and Baltimore.

All in all, a very good trip. It’s a pretty good location all around: convenient, dog friendly, flexible, etc. I think if we go back again soon, maybe we’ll try hiking south from Caledonia State Park instead of north. But other than that, I’m not sure what the options are for changing it up much. I wish there were more things like this in and around Maryland. There’s more in Virginia and West Virginia, for sure, but that’s harder for us to get to for a weekend trip. Alas. I’ll keep looking :-).